Were my Microsoft Certification Exams Worth it?

As important as it is for Software Developers to keep current with emerging technologies, it is equally important to choose wisely when it comes to learning them. Indeed, there is a finite amount of time to devote to self-improvement. This truth became evident most recently while I’ve been thinking about my personal goals for the year and trying to decide whether or not I should try to obtain the more recent Microsoft certifications on .NET 4.0, such as Web Developer or Azure Developer on Visual Studio 2010. It got me to thinking about all the time I spent at the beginning of my career getting certified and whether or not that investment has paid dividends.

As described in Contrasting 2 Job Rejections, I was scared about my job prospects after graduating college. Once I got a job, I felt that I needed to ensure I had opportunities going forward and figured getting Microsoft Certifications would be the best way to differentiate myself from the candidate pool. I took 14 tests in less than 3 years, passing 12 and failing twice. I obtained the status Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE), Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA), and Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (MCSD). You can see my transcript here (enter transcript ID “677424” and access code “insights”).

Some of the tests were paid for by my employer, some were not. I usually studied using the officially released self-paced training kit for each test, but I’ve also purchased expensive training videos, exam crams, used free web casts, etc. I was completely immersed in the certification process. I actually understood all the options and the Microsoft certification path, of which there are now many. Since it’s been almost 2 years since I’ve taken any, I find myself out of the loop, wondering if it makes sense for me to re-enter this world.

At the time of this writing, I have about 7 years of professional software development experience, enough to significantly reduce the amount of studying required to pass a certification test compared to earlier in my career.

Microsoft
Certifications
Expected Study time (hours) Completed Study Time (hours) Practice Tests (hours) Days Studying Hours Per Day Test Date
70-270 (Microsoft
Windows XP Professional)
45 51.00 9.50 35 1.73 February 12,2004
70-290 (Windows Server
2003 Environment)
31 28.00 3 23 1.35 March 10, 2004
70-291 (Windows 2003
Network Infrastructure)
47.5 78.00 11.5 122 0.73 July 9, 2004
Took Test on July 9th 9 4.5 12 1.13 July 21, 2004
70-293 (Windows 2003
Planning a Network)
22 12 4 15 1.07 August 5, 2004
Took Test on August 5th 30.50 8.5 64 0.61 October 8, 2004
70-294 (Windows Server
2003 Active Directory)
21 14.08 4 31 0.58 April 2, 2005
70-297 (Win2003 A.D.
& Network Infastructure)
16.5 16.92 2.5 17 1.14 April 19, 2005
70-228 (SQL 2000
Administration)
55 53.42 5.5 72 0.82 May 27, 2005
70-229 (SQL 2000
Development)
24 23.50 3 151 0.18 October 29, 2005
70-315 (Web Apps with
Visual C# .NET)
34 45.50 13.5 81 0.73 January 24, 2006
70-320 (XML Web Services
with C# .NET)
40 34.00 3 42 0.88 May 2, 2006
70-316 (Windows Apps
with Visual C# .NET)
14 15.42 3.25 22 0.85 June 6, 2006
70-300 (Solutions
Architecture & Req’ts)
12 7.58 9 47 0.35 September 28, 2006
70-553 (Upgrade MCSD to
MCPD : Part 1)
82 16.00 4 428 0.05 April 12, 2008
70-554 (Upgrade MCSD to
MCPD : Part 2)
55 0.00 5 22 0.23 May 5, 2008
Took Test on May 5th still counting 0.00 February 28, 2009?
70-502 (.NET 3.5 –
Windows Presentation Foundation)
14 14.00 6 108 0.19 December 13, 2008
70-561 (.NET 3.5 –
ADO.NET)
12.25 12.50 0.5 18 0.72 May 2, 2009

Would obtaining more certifications be valuable? Looking back, I feel that it was worth it to work towards achieving the certifications that I did. They served 2 purposes:

Milestones for Self-Motivated Learning

By deciding to get certified, I was declaring a personal goal that was tangible and had benefits other than just self-improvement. Many of the topics involved in certification were topics that I wanted to learn about anyway, especially early in my career. For example, I was assigned to my first professional web application project about the same time that I was ready to begin studying for the related certification. Since my professional life and personal interests were colliding, I found it much easier to be motivated to study and create small side projects to practice what I had learned. Better yet, knowing the milestone of passing the test would aid in job security added to the incentive to learn.

Measurable Proficiency

I have heard people in the IT industry downplay the significance of certifications, especially those from Microsoft. Some have argued that the tested topics do not accurately reflect skills that are required to perform well on the job. Others state that the proliferation of “brain dumps,” practice tests that have actual questions from real exams (and are considered cheating), marginalize what the tests represent.

My feeling is that there is a lot of truth to these points. However, employers still seemed to have placed some value on certifications. They may have asked, “If certification tests are so trivial, why doesn’t everyone have them?” I found in the years after my achievements, that it did help in my job search. I believe it exhibited measurable proficiency in topics that I claimed to have experience in. This differentiated me from others who could merely state something to the effect of: “Experience = ASP.NET – 2 years.” The achievement generated conversation in interviews. When asked about my certifications, I got to explain how I set personal goals and followed through on them, learning a great deal of relevant skills in the process. @MikeWo also reminded me on twitter that companies need certain certification requirements of their employees to keep partner status, yet another benefit to hiring someone who has them already or displays the ability to pass them quickly.

Having established that it was worthwhile to get certified in the past, does that mean I should set a goal for future certifications?

It is yet to be determined, but I don’t think so. The direction I am trying to take with my career is not to spend focused time learning the details of the next version of ASP.NET, for example. I have also already built my resume to a point where “getting my foot in the door” is not the problem it used to be. Therefore, the benefits listed above do not quite align with what I want to achieve going forward. I could always afford to learn more about Microsoft technologies, such as .NET, but I already know enough to be effective. I am more interested in learning non-Microsoft technologies these days, like jQuery, Mercurial, or anything Google, so I may be convinced to take a test for a new, interesting technology once it is released and known to have value throughout the industry. Lastly, I believe that the best way to get a great job is a great network and by establishing the ability to get things done.

Time to buckle down and get things done then…

Exam Tip: No matter how much you study before-hand, always cram: it’s important to have that info in short-term memory going into the test. It’s also highly beneficial to gauge your readiness by taking a practice test with a company like Transcender.

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About Stu
I am a software developer living in Cincinnati, OH. I primarily focus on .NET and Microsoft technologies and have bounced around quite a bit in my short career between multiple cities in the Midwest (including Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, and St. Louis). I would like to learn more about programming, technology, marketing, and how to run a business. -Nathan Stuller

3 Responses to Were my Microsoft Certification Exams Worth it?

  1. Brad says:

    I started down the MCSD path back when we worked together, since it was paid for and I thought it might be worthwhile. But I found myself studying to the test, not to really learn the material. So I was not really learning anything. I just thought it might help me get my foot in the door somewhere else, but later found out in talking with a lot of other people that no one seemed to care about certifications anymore.

    So after leaving that job, I stopped after having passed 2 of the tests. My current employer does not pay for certifications, though there is always talk from time to time that they are considering it. But we do have internal training programs for specific skills that I find to be much more useful for learning what I need to do my job better, rather than studying to pass a test in order to get another resume line item. I would rather truly learn to do something than just get a piece of paper that says I know how. I realize I really should get to learn something when studying for one of those tests, but when the end goal is just to pass the test, there is the tendency to cut corners and just learn what you need to know to pass.

    • Stu says:

      I think the issue of studying to the test is one of the main reasons why some are cynical about the value of certifications. Mostly, I agree with what you say. I guess it’s just a matter of personal philosophy. If we’re talking about self-directed reading about technical topics, I personally find it easier to be motivated when the certification is the end goal. Sure, I read about topics that do not even have a certification as the end goal, but I usually go about it more passively. In those cases, I tend to assume I know the material after just reading it versus developing sample projects and practicing like I would in preparation for a test.

      In regards to internal training, I agree that those types of sessions usually are more focused and therefore more effective. One of the drawbacks of working for small companies as I have lately is that those types of opportunities are more rare. I get a lot of my training from podcasts and local .NET user groups.

  2. Pingback: 2013 New Year’s Resolutions and a Little Friend « Midwest Developer Insights

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