Blank Karnaugh Map – How One Search Keyword Changed my Way of Thinking

3 Years ago, I wrote a blog post titled “I Heart Karnaugh Maps.” In it, I described a technique that can be used to reduce the complexity of Boolean expressions. I provided sample diagrams as I worked through the technique step by step. In one of them, I added an alt tag of “Blank Karnaugh Map” to describe the starting point of the whole process. Little did I know that defining such a targeted search keyword would alter my perspective about Internet search traffic.

Blank Karnaugh Maps

That blog post has always ranked in the top 20% of all my posts in terms of page views, largely due to the one keyword.

Among my blog’s highest ranking keywords are:

4th “Blank Karnaugh Map”

9th “Karnaugh Map”

12th “Blank Karnaugh Maps”

I first learned about Karnaugh Maps as a programming tool in my undergraduate studies at The Ohio State University. In Math 366: “Discrete Mathematics with Applications” I learned:

  • Mathematical formalization and reasoning, logic, and Boolean algebra
  • Sets, functions, relations, recursive definitions, and mathematical induction
  • Elementary counting principles

In order to refresh my knowledge before my blog post, I read an Electronics book. In neither the book nor the course do I remember a specific need for blank karnaugh maps or images of blank karnaugh maps. Therefore, as time passed, I was lead to wonder, why do so many people need blank karnaugh maps?

Has an Opportunity Presented Itself?

I had a few conversations with fellow software developers who were intrigued by my Karnaugh Map post. Apparently, Karnaugh Maps were drawing more interest than I expected and my site was getting found by people looking to know more about them. I decided to brainstorm ways I could leverage this interest into a software product I could sell. I figured people were already coming to my blog to find information about Karnaugh Maps and software development tips. Wouldn’t a product that uses this technology to improve code be useful to my readers? I decided to call it Logic Reducer.

The Market

By no means am I a good Internet marketer. However, I had recently signed up for the Micropreneur Academy and was learning the value of performing market research before beginning product development. I wanted to make sure that I could plausibly make a profit based on the number of potential users and competition. I used three high-level approaches in my research.

Quantity of Internet Searches

There are various methods to research how many people are looking for a particular topic online. I used Micro Niche Finder to determine that “Karnaugh Maps” was being searched about 1,600 times per month. While this is not a lot, I was encouraged by the quantity of searches of some of the longer-tail keywords and the relative ease with which my website could potentially rank for them.

Occupational Statistics

In order to gauge the number of potential users for my product, I researched U.S. employment data. I estimated there were about 800,000 computer engineers and 200,000 hardware engineers in the United States. These numbers were very encouraging.

Competition

Using Google, I found several applications on the Web that had the features I wanted to build. Many of them were free. However, in reading related forums, it seemed like they often failed because they froze up or had a very limited feature set. Additionally, I did not find any on the Internet that were newer than 2006. Most of the applications were downloadable, thick clients. They were lacking the advantages of being Web products.

Karnaugh Map Minimizer on SourceForce gets .5K hits/day

Logic Minimizer 1.2.1

Karnaugh Map – minimalization software

In 2010, smart phone app stores appeared to still be growing rapidly. I was leaning toward making an iPhone app that could be used as a companion to someone writing software on a personal computer. I found a few apps that already existed:

KarnCalc $.99

Karnaugh Map Optimizer $.99

Logic Shrinker –Free-

While a few cheap apps already existed, I liked that there were not yet any iPad apps. Also, one review of an app stated that if Boolean Simplification (a feature I planned to develop) were included, he would pay 7 or 8 dollars for the app. My findings did not deter me from moving forward to the next step.

How far Did I Go?

I liked that there were potentially many users of my idea. However, there were already very affordable ways to accomplish what I was considering my main value proposal. Therefore, I moved forward cautiously. I was optimistic, so I secured the domain name LogicReducer.com. However, I was concerned that there wasn’t enough market interest so I looked for validation of my idea.

I wanted to have a designer mockup my ideas so I could more clearly describe them. I got a quote from an offshore design agency for 4 screen mockups and 1 logo. It was going to cost $500.

I asked more people about what they thought regarding my idea. The general response was that people were intrigued by the product being a Boolean logic reducer. However, I also posted to the forums in the Micropreneur Academy and multiple people voiced some warnings. They felt it catered to too small of a niche, that I would not be able to gain enough revenue to make the project worthwhile.

I decided to stop working toward building Logic Reducer at that point. I was scared by the surprisingly high $500 investment for mockups and the concerns about the niche.

What Will I Do Next Time?

All in all, I did not spend very much time or money determining if Logic Reducer would be a good product to build, especially when compared to the time it would have taken to complete it and watch it fail. My blog content had exposed a tiny sliver of opportunity on the Internet. I researched that sliver and determined that I couldn’t make enough money from it for it to be worth my time.

However, I still think this is a good strategy for finding business ideas. Bloggers and content producers who have the ability to use analytics to see what topics are of interest to readers can use that knowledge to find problems in the world. Were I to find another surprisingly popular search keyword, I would research related business opportunities similar to how I did it before.

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Which Platform is the Best for My Mobile App?

I am currently sitting at the Cincinnati Microsoft office attending the CINNUG Mobile Development FireStarter. This free training session covers how to create mobile applications for Android, iPhone, and Windows Mobile phones. I do not have any immediate plans to create a mobile application soon, so what am I hoping to get out of this session?

3 Highlights I Want to Learn Today about Mobile App Platforms:

  • Pros & Cons of different platforms
  • Enough knowledge to be able to manage an outsourced app developer
  • Insight as to which platform is emerging as the leader

Throughout my career, I have been heavily focused on Microsoft development technologies. Often times recently, I have wondered if I should branch out to other languages and platforms. I have not yet done this, but if I were to move into mobile development (something I have limited experience with so far), it would be an ideal time to jump on the best platform as opposed to using Microsoft without questioning the decision. Therefore, I am happy to take advantage of this training session and glad that the format will discuss 3 different platforms.

What Did I Learn?

The training is over and I have formed some conclusions while generating even more questions. Below are summaries of what I learned.

Pros & Cons of Different Platforms

If I want to sell a mobile application then I need to make a good decision for which platform to build it. Each platform has its own benefits so it is possible that each platform could be best for certain types of applications. Below are the high-level Pros and Cons for each platform:

Android

Android Nexus One

Photo by Spieri_SF
    Pro

    Quickly gaining popularity

    Open source    

    Con

    Uses Java

    Somewhat limited for game development

iPhone

iPhone Image

Photo by William Hook
    Pro

    Most Popular

    Same OS for iPhone, iPod Touch & iPad

    Con

    Development requires a Mac

    Uses Objective C

    Only distributable through the app store

Windows Mobile/Windows Phone

iPhone Image

Photo by Brooks Elliott
    Pro

    Familiar tools and language

    Mature – platform has existed for a while

    Con

    No physical devices for new platform version (7)

    Adoption is a downward trend

 

Enough Knowledge to Be Able to Manage an Outsourced App Developer

Realistically, I am not going to drop all my plans or projects to dive in and write an iPhone application. I have enough wisdom to know that would probably be a waste of time unless I really want to learn iPhone development or if I had a great idea for an app for which I knew there was a market. Therefore, I don’t need to know at this time how to develop a mobile application. I just need to understand the highlights.

I am trying to prepare for the moment when I have that great idea for a mobile application. When that happens, I don’t want to be clueless about the next steps involved. I want to have a good idea for limitations of current platforms, which technologies are emerging, and how to move forward getting the thing developed.

Ideally, I will someday “own” a mobile application. When the time comes, my plan is to hire someone to build it, but I do not want to be ignorant to what is involved. By seeing these demos, I have been introduced to developing mobile applications. If I want to learn the details, I know where to start. If I want to hire someone else to develop a mobile app, I can now intelligently discuss the project and properly vet the person’s credentials.

 

Insight as to Which Platform is Emerging as the Leader

Perhaps the most important aspect to deciding which platform to develop for is how popular it is. Simply put, the bigger the market that my application can reach, the more sales leads that can be generated. So which platform will the most users be running when my application is finished and ready to be sold?

At the time of this writing, the iPhone is the most popular of these 3 devices. 2nd is Windows Mobile, with Android placing 3rd.

Most importantly, iPhone users consume the most network bandwidth out of all smart phone users. I believe this is a testament to the high user engagement with iPhones and consider this a forecast of its future growth. Some industry experts have opined that Google’s Android platform will emerge as the leader given its “open” paradigm is more beneficial to developers. Still Microsoft’s upcoming release of Windows 7 Phones may tip the market share into their favor.

I am by no means an expert, but my bet would be that the iPhone will be the dominant smart phone platform for the next few years. The barrier to entry for users is low and it already has a head start influencing the industry. Everyone that has an iPhone loves it and everyone who doesn’t have one wants one. I don’t know a single person who is excited for any Windows Phone news and only a few who are aware of Android’s developments.

If Apple ever allows the iPhone to be used with wireless networks in addition to AT&T, such as Verizon, look out! They will have removed the biggest barrier left to everyone wanting one.

Which mobile platform do you see emerging? Which platform would you recommend? Your opinion is probably more informed than mine.